Teeth need attention too

Pet Dentistry

How to keep your pet's teeth as clean as yours

Does your pet suffer from bad breath?

Tooth decay is a leading cause of ’halitosis’ or bad breath in pets. The same reasons people get bad breath apply to pets – periodontal pockets, gingivitis, root exposure and gum infections all affect dogs and cats. Even if your pets crowns (the exposed part of the tooth) are clean, there could be disease lurking below the gum line. Some professional pet dentistry and basic care can help.

Will my pet need antibiotics before the procedure?

Your veterinarian will assess each tooth to determine whether your pet will require antibiotics before and after the procedure. For a simple scale and polish, antibiotics are generally not prescribed. For cases of severe periodontal disease, your veterinarian usually will prescribe one or more antibiotics.

What is involved in a dental procedure?

Most dogs and cats are anaesthetised for their dental procedures for 3 main reasons:

  1. Often cleaning below the gumline is painful if there is infection and      inflammation, without anaesthesia, optimal cleaning cannot be performed
  2. To stop your pet from moving
  3. To secure the airway. Scaling teeth causes bacteria to aerosolise, meaning that pets could end up with pneumonia if the airway isn’t secured using a special tube called an endotracheal tube

After anaesthesia is induced, your veterinarian will scale microscopic calculus from your pet’s teeth above and below the gumline with an ultrasonic scaler. They will then polish the teeth to prevent re-attachment of plaque.
If any teeth need to be extracted, Southern Cross Veterinary Clinic staff are well trained in delivering local anaesthetic prior to drilling the teeth.

Why choose Southern Cross Veterinary Clinic if your pet requires dental work?

Our patients get treated with the same equipment that you would be at your dentist. We use exclusively ACTEON brand equipment.

Recovery

After a dental, most pets will be able to go home the same day. If your pet has an extraction, most pets will feel much more comfortable around 5 days after their procedure. Many owners notice their pet becoming more playful and content after their dental work.

Continuing Care Dental Plan

It’s recommended to start a special dental diet for the first month after dental work to prevent new plaque formation. A checkup at 6 months is advised to ensure the continued success of the dental plan.